•  
Walker transforms into a riding toy when baby is ready. Best used on carpet, as it does tend to slide rather than roll.
<p><strong>Toy Description</strong></p> <p>Plastic toy converts from a push-walker to a ride-on with a simple locking mechanism under the top cover. The top cover forms the seat when in the riding form, then acts as the front bumper when turned into the walker.</p> <p>Various knobs, clicking pieces, and wheels add interest to the top cover.</p> <p>Wheels are made of plastic.</p> <p>Assembly requires a Phillips screwdriver.</p> <p>Weight limit is 42 lbs.</p> <p><strong>Play</strong></p> <p>Meant to keep up with baby&rsquo;s development, this toy transforms from a stabilizing walking toy into a ride-on. Babies can push the walker in front of them, helping to keep steady as they practice taking those early steps. Later, when walking has been mastered, the cover flips down to make a seat for baby to ride.</p> <p><strong>Observations</strong></p> <p>The feedback on this toy has been mixed, to say the least. It worked out wonderfully for some users, with the toy being enjoyed, frequently used, and even passed on to another kid when the first one outgrew it. On the other end of the feedback spectrum, other users complained that it tipped easily, slid out from under the baby, and was sized incorrectly to be used as either a walker or rider. With this said, the majority of users do seem pleased. About a third are upset with the toy, and we think that&rsquo;s a pretty large number.</p> <p>On hard surfaces, such as wooden and tile floors, the wheels tend to slide rather than roll. Carpet seems best for this toy, as it slows the toy down to where baby is actually pushing it rather than trying to run after it. Even then, having carpet with very short pile or that is worn down may still create a slip-n-slide scenario. We strongly suggest being close by to ensure that the toy is functioning as intended.</p> <p>The walker tips easily, so children who are more vigorous with their practice steps may knock themselves down more often than a child who is a patient learner. It the child doesn&rsquo;t try to turn or lean, they should stay upright.</p> <p>Meant to move in a straight line, there is no wheel to turn the toy. It can be turned by scooting it to face another direction, but there is no steering mechanism, so to speak. Trying to turn it just makes it fall over, taking baby with it.</p> <p>A number of users have complained that the wheel base is too narrow when in the walker form, causing babies to step on the wheels instead of the ground. The rider has the opposite problem, being too wide in the seat for some, making it difficult to actually push forward. Overstretching the hips can also be a little painful.</p> <p>Again, many users had none of these problems, or they decided the problems weren&rsquo;t a big deal. Babies do frequently fall when learning to walk, and some bangs and bumps are to be expected. We did not receive reports of grievous injury due to this toy. It really comes down to whether or not the baby fits the toy well and how much they like using it. Just like with other toys.</p> <p><strong>Care</strong></p> <ul> <li>Wipe down with damp cloth</li> <li>Wash in warm soapy water in bathtub</li> </ul> <p>For more information on how to clean plastic toys, take a look at our blog, <a href="/Blogs1/The-Cleaning-Guide-for-Toys.htm" linktype="8" target="_self">The Cleaning Guide for Toys</a>.</p> <p><strong>Parts and Pieces</strong></p> <p>All required parts are included with the toy.</p> <p><strong>Concerns</strong></p> <p>While the toy tipping over is annoying, we see that as more a fact of life. Babies are going to knock things down while they learn to walk. What does concern us is the toy&rsquo;s tendency to slide forward. While falling on their face is also something babies do all on their own, we aren&rsquo;t convinced a toy that may increase this occurrence is really worth it.</p>
Step Start Walk 'n Ride
Date published: 2016-06-02
6.50 / 10 stars

Step Start Walk 'n Ride

by Playskool
current stage2016-06-02

First, children use it for stability as they take their early steps. Once they’ve mastered walking, change the toy into a rider so toddlers can practice pushing themselves forward using both legs at once.

Most users report being happy with their purchase, though we did notice a decent number of people who share similar problems. Slipping on hardwood, tipping easily due to an inability to turn, and not quite fitting some children are the common complaints. Of course, these aren’t universal, as each child responds to a toy differently. 

  • Playskool Step Start Walk 'n Ride
  • Playskool Step Start Walk 'n Ride
Playskool Step Start Walk 'n Ride
Overall6.50
This measures the quality of the materials and production processes used.
Quality
  • 7.00
 
Including both gross and fine motor skills, this measure how much this toy engages and challenges physical mobility, body awareness, and coordination.
Motor
  • 7.50
 
Used only for baby toys, we grade toys on the types of sounds they make. Be it soothing lullabies, energizing dance music, or animal sounds, noises should not be dangerously loud.
Audio Stimulation
  • 3.00
 
Used only for baby toys, this measures how much this toy will keep baby’s attention by drawing their eye.
Visual Stimulation
  • 6.00
 
This score refers to this toy's ability to teach your child that every cause has an effect.
Cause and Effect
  • 7.00
 
Used only for baby toys, this measures how attractive a toy is to a baby, as well as how long they will likely pay attention to it. Used instead of Replay.
Holds Interest
  • 7.50
 

Product Specs

Age 9 - 36 months
Made in China
Recalls No
Batteries None
Materials Plastic
Choking Hazard Not if used appropriately
Date Reviewed 05/26/2016

Where to Buy

Amazon $29.99
Pros
  • Two forms increases usefulness
  • Provides assistance for feet new to walking
Cons
  • Slips on hardwood floors, best on carpet
  • Does not fit all sizes
  • Tips easily
Detailed Review

Toy Description

Plastic toy converts from a push-walker to a ride-on with a simple locking mechanism under the top cover. The top cover forms the seat when in the riding form, then acts as the front bumper when turned into the walker.

Various knobs, clicking pieces, and wheels add interest to the top cover.

Wheels are made of plastic.

Assembly requires a Phillips screwdriver.

Weight limit is 42 lbs.

Play

Meant to keep up with baby’s development, this toy transforms from a stabilizing walking toy into a ride-on. Babies can push the walker in front of them, helping to keep steady as they practice taking those early steps. Later, when walking has been mastered, the cover flips down to make a seat for baby to ride.

Observations

The feedback on this toy has been mixed, to say the least. It worked out wonderfully for some users, with the toy being enjoyed, frequently used, and even passed on to another kid when the first one outgrew it. On the other end of the feedback spectrum, other users complained that it tipped easily, slid out from under the baby, and was sized incorrectly to be used as either a walker or rider. With this said, the majority of users do seem pleased. About a third are upset with the toy, and we think that’s a pretty large number.

On hard surfaces, such as wooden and tile floors, the wheels tend to slide rather than roll. Carpet seems best for this toy, as it slows the toy down to where baby is actually pushing it rather than trying to run after it. Even then, having carpet with very short pile or that is worn down may still create a slip-n-slide scenario. We strongly suggest being close by to ensure that the toy is functioning as intended.

The walker tips easily, so children who are more vigorous with their practice steps may knock themselves down more often than a child who is a patient learner. It the child doesn’t try to turn or lean, they should stay upright.

Meant to move in a straight line, there is no wheel to turn the toy. It can be turned by scooting it to face another direction, but there is no steering mechanism, so to speak. Trying to turn it just makes it fall over, taking baby with it.

A number of users have complained that the wheel base is too narrow when in the walker form, causing babies to step on the wheels instead of the ground. The rider has the opposite problem, being too wide in the seat for some, making it difficult to actually push forward. Overstretching the hips can also be a little painful.

Again, many users had none of these problems, or they decided the problems weren’t a big deal. Babies do frequently fall when learning to walk, and some bangs and bumps are to be expected. We did not receive reports of grievous injury due to this toy. It really comes down to whether or not the baby fits the toy well and how much they like using it. Just like with other toys.

Care

  • Wipe down with damp cloth
  • Wash in warm soapy water in bathtub

For more information on how to clean plastic toys, take a look at our blog, The Cleaning Guide for Toys.

Parts and Pieces

All required parts are included with the toy.

Concerns

While the toy tipping over is annoying, we see that as more a fact of life. Babies are going to knock things down while they learn to walk. What does concern us is the toy’s tendency to slide forward. While falling on their face is also something babies do all on their own, we aren’t convinced a toy that may increase this occurrence is really worth it.

Manufacturer's Description

Talk about a toy that grows with you! This-two-in-one toy grows with your child from six months to two years. First, it helps baby stand and walk. Later, when your child’s ready to explore the house even more, it converts to a ride-on walker (with a locking mechanism only grownups can activate). But it’s more than just a walker -- it’s an activity center, too, with fun hands-on activities like a clicking gearshift, spinning drum, flexible antenna, spinner and touchable textures. You might have big grown-up car, Mom, but baby’s the one with the really sweet ride! This toy also helps teach Fine Motor Skills and Gross Motor Skills. For kids 9 to 36 months.

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