•  
A quick-paced numbers game that lets kids practice their number recognition and basic math skills. Fun, too.
<p><strong>Toy Description</strong></p> <p>Wooden gameboard has 4 sets of Number Keys around the edges. Each set has numbers 1 through 10.</p> <p>The gameboard (gamebox?), lid, two dice, and instructions are included.</p> <p><strong>Play</strong></p> <p>The goal is for a player to get all their Number Keys pulled up. The first to do so wins.</p> <p>The game starts will all Number Keys laying down. A player rolls the dice, using the two numbers to create a new number that they can use to pull up one of their Number Keys. The numbers can be added, subtracted, multiplied, or divided together to get a new number.</p> <p>For instance, let&rsquo;s say that the numbers 2 and 4 are rolled. That player could then choose to do one of the following:</p> <p>Addition: 2 + 4 = 6, so the player can pull up their 6 Key.</p> <p>Subtraction: 4 &ndash; 2 = 2, so the player can pull up their 2 Key.</p> <p>Multiplication: 2 X 4 = 8, so the player can pull up their 8 Key.</p> <p>Division: 4 / 2 = 2, so the player could pull up their 2 Key.</p> <p>If the numbers cannot be used to create any numbers still showing for that player, they just skip that turn and pass the dice to the next player.</p> <p>The numbers are listed as 1 through 10, so there is a bit of a limitation on how the numbers can be used. Two sets of keys can be changed with a marker to included numbers 11 through 20, if need be.</p> <p>It can be played competitively with 2 to 4 players, or solo as a way to practice number recognition.</p> <p><strong>Observations</strong></p> <p>Unexpected to us, children who often have a hard time paying attention seem to really enjoy this game. Because the child has to think of multiple possible ways to use the numbers, they are actively thinking rather than just having a number told to them, making them active participants. Many users have reported being surprised at how well some children take to this game, and of course, being very pleased with the number practice it provides.</p> <p>This is best for children just being introduced to their numbers and basic math skills. The challenge comes from number recognition and basic math skills. Children between the ages of 5&nbsp;and 9&nbsp;may be best suited to it.</p> <p>As we mentioned above in Play, the numbers only go from 1 to 10, so there is some limitation on how the numbers rolled can be manipulated. &nbsp;Of course, part of the game is learning what equations result in what numbers, so knowing the boundaries and limits is also educational.</p> <p>We&rsquo;ve had occasional reports of dice arriving with the holes not fully painted, or the paint being misaligned, as well as some dice arriving with chipped or cracked corners. This seems to happen very rarely.</p> <p>The wooden gameboard feels quite light, which can give some users the impression that it is low quality. It does not seem to bother children as they are playing, though. There is a lid that slides into groves in the box, making for easy storage.</p> <p><strong>Care</strong></p> <p>Wipe down with a damp cloth.</p> <p>For more information on how to clean wooden toys, see our blog, <a href="/Blogs1/The-Cleaning-Guide-for-Toys.htm" linktype="8" target="_self">The Cleaning Guide for Toys</a>.</p> <p><strong>Parts and Pieces</strong></p> <p>Everything needed is included in the box.</p> <p><strong>Concerns</strong></p> <p>This is really only meant for children just being introduced to basis arithmetic. Additionally, only having Keys numbered 1 through 10 can be limiting, so changing the numbers to read 11 through 20 may be desired.</p>
Ideal 4-Way CountDown Game
Date published: 2016-08-01
9.00 / 10 stars

Ideal 4-Way CountDown Game

by Ideal
current stage2016-08-01

A math toy that actually appeals to young children is hard to find, but found one we have. 4-Way Countdown has very fast rounds, maintaining a competitive yet fun energy that holds a kid’s interest. Each turn is played by rolling two dice, then using basic math skills to turn those two numbers into one number ranging from 1 through 10. The first player to get all ten numbers wins the game.

We were a little surprised at how well small children take to this game. The challenge of number recognition as well as deciding how best to use their turn makes kids more proactive in their gameplay than they would be when just drawing cards or having a number given to them. Best suited for kids who are just learning their numbers, this wooden game has only two dice to keep up with, and a slid-in lid that makes storage easy.

  • Ideal 4-Way CountDown Game
  • Ideal 4-Way CountDown Game
  • Ideal 4-Way CountDown Game
  • Ideal 4-Way CountDown Game
Ideal 4-Way CountDown Game
Overall9.00
This measure how often, for how long, and how many different ages will play with this toy. A great toy will be loved for years, and is still wanted as the child grows.
Replay
  • 8.50
 
This measures the quality of the materials and production processes used.
Quality
  • 8.00
 
This scores how well a toy encourages critical thinking, pattern recognition, and memory improvement.
Cognitive
  • 9.00
 
Including both gross and fine motor skills, this measure how much this toy engages and challenges physical mobility, body awareness, and coordination.
Motor
  • 6.00
 
This measures how likely a toy is to spark social play between children or how well it teaches socially healthy behavior.
Social
  • 6.00
 

Product Specs

Age 5 - 9
Made in China
Recalls No
Batteries None
Materials Wood, Plastic die
Choking Hazard Includes Small Parts
Date Reviewed 08/01/2016

Where to Buy

Amazon $57.99
Pros
  • A basic introduction for children new to numbers and math skills
  • Quick rounds keep ahold of young attention spans
  • Built-in lid makes for portability and easy storage
  • Not a bunch of lose-able pieces, just dice
Cons
  • Not the best quality, though kids don’t seem to notice
Detailed Review

Toy Description

Wooden gameboard has 4 sets of Number Keys around the edges. Each set has numbers 1 through 10.

The gameboard (gamebox?), lid, two dice, and instructions are included.

Play

The goal is for a player to get all their Number Keys pulled up. The first to do so wins.

The game starts will all Number Keys laying down. A player rolls the dice, using the two numbers to create a new number that they can use to pull up one of their Number Keys. The numbers can be added, subtracted, multiplied, or divided together to get a new number.

For instance, let’s say that the numbers 2 and 4 are rolled. That player could then choose to do one of the following:

Addition: 2 + 4 = 6, so the player can pull up their 6 Key.

Subtraction: 4 – 2 = 2, so the player can pull up their 2 Key.

Multiplication: 2 X 4 = 8, so the player can pull up their 8 Key.

Division: 4 / 2 = 2, so the player could pull up their 2 Key.

If the numbers cannot be used to create any numbers still showing for that player, they just skip that turn and pass the dice to the next player.

The numbers are listed as 1 through 10, so there is a bit of a limitation on how the numbers can be used. Two sets of keys can be changed with a marker to included numbers 11 through 20, if need be.

It can be played competitively with 2 to 4 players, or solo as a way to practice number recognition.

Observations

Unexpected to us, children who often have a hard time paying attention seem to really enjoy this game. Because the child has to think of multiple possible ways to use the numbers, they are actively thinking rather than just having a number told to them, making them active participants. Many users have reported being surprised at how well some children take to this game, and of course, being very pleased with the number practice it provides.

This is best for children just being introduced to their numbers and basic math skills. The challenge comes from number recognition and basic math skills. Children between the ages of 5 and 9 may be best suited to it.

As we mentioned above in Play, the numbers only go from 1 to 10, so there is some limitation on how the numbers rolled can be manipulated.  Of course, part of the game is learning what equations result in what numbers, so knowing the boundaries and limits is also educational.

We’ve had occasional reports of dice arriving with the holes not fully painted, or the paint being misaligned, as well as some dice arriving with chipped or cracked corners. This seems to happen very rarely.

The wooden gameboard feels quite light, which can give some users the impression that it is low quality. It does not seem to bother children as they are playing, though. There is a lid that slides into groves in the box, making for easy storage.

Care

Wipe down with a damp cloth.

For more information on how to clean wooden toys, see our blog, The Cleaning Guide for Toys.

Parts and Pieces

Everything needed is included in the box.

Concerns

This is really only meant for children just being introduced to basis arithmetic. Additionally, only having Keys numbered 1 through 10 can be limiting, so changing the numbers to read 11 through 20 may be desired.

Manufacturer's Description

This award-winning educational game from Ideal® is the perfect addition to family game night! Players must use their addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division skills on the numbers rolled by the dice to flip up the number keys. This is a great way to help kids strengthen their math skills – and they’ll be having so much fun they won’t even notice they are practicing math! A perfect educational gift for kids ages 6 and up. Designed to be played with 2 to 4 players.

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