•  
Is your friend more of a fridge or a blender? Ask similar questions about the player, and see which answers arise. The most popular answer wins.
<p><strong>Toy Description</strong></p> <p>A gameboard with sections to add in player names is the basis for this card-drawing game of comparing friends to objects.</p> <p><strong>Play</strong></p> <p>Set-up is done by putting the names of eight players along the Name Circle. Please use the included non-permanent marker, or a dry erase marker when doing this. If there are not eight people playing, or those players don&rsquo;t all know each other very well, feel free to put in the names of fictional characters or celebrities, just so long as they are known to all the players.</p> <p>A turn starts by a player rolling the die to indicate how many spaces to move the grey marker around the name circle. The marker can be moved in either direction. The person that the marker lands on will be the Subject for the Question card for that turn. Let&rsquo;s say the marker lands on Sam&rsquo;s name.</p> <p>The player who rolled the die draws a Question card, and reads it aloud to the group. Using the name of the player who is this round&rsquo;s Subject, the card will read something like &ldquo;Imaginiff&hellip;. Sam were a kitchen appliance. Which would Sam be?&rdquo; There will be six possible answers to choose from, each numbered one through six. Each player shuffles through their Number cards to find the number that corresponds to the answer they think best fits the question.</p> <p>Each player lays down their Number card facedown. When all players have placed their Number cards, the cards are turned over, and the most popular answer choice is determined. All players who played the most popular number get to move their pawn forward one space on the board.</p> <p>When our team played it, we changed the rules a bit.</p> <p>We decided that players could write down their own answers if they didn&rsquo;t like the available ones. We just used a bunch of scratch paper cut into squares, and each player jotted down a silly answer, then tossed the paper into the bunch. The group decided which answer was the funniest/most creative, and the player who penned it got to move forward one space. This made it more creative feeling. We never actually finished the game due to the laughing, joking, and talking we got into each round. But I totally would have won if we had played to completion.</p> <p>In short, we changed the rules to be more of an <a href="/Toys/Apples-to-Apples-Party-Box---The-Game-of-Crazy-Combinations-Includes-New-Updated-Content.htm" linktype="8" target="_self">Apples to Apples</a> sort of game.</p> <p><strong>Observations</strong></p> <p>Let&rsquo;s be clear: this is not a game for people who can&rsquo;t take a little ribbing. The entire point of the game is to laugh while expressing the essence of a player&rsquo;s personality as an object or situation. People who think themselves a sleek, stainless steel, high powered blender when compared to kitchen appliances shouldn&rsquo;t get upset when the other players say they&rsquo;re more of a fridge. Laugh, mock without being cutting, and accept the jokes with the same good humor as used when dishing them out.</p> <p>Users agree that this game is only as fun as the players make it. If one player doesn&rsquo;t want to get creative with their reasons for their answer, or can&rsquo;t risk poking a little fun because someone is too sensitive, then this game simply won&rsquo;t play out well.</p> <p>We&rsquo;re giving this game a high Social score because of the way it encourages players to read the emotional reactions of those around them, as well as tempering any internal awkwardness when they themselves are the subject of a Question card. All in all, this game is a good way to practice how jolly, light hearted teasing works in real life.</p> <p>It seems to work best with players who already feel comfortable with each other, meaning it&rsquo;s not all that great as an ice-breaker. At the same time, it&rsquo;s also not all that great for people who maybe already know everything about each other.</p> <p>Recommended for ages 14 and up, this game doesn&rsquo;t work well for younger children. The Question cards aren&rsquo;t racy or risqu&eacute; in any way, but a fun game experience requires coming up with creative person-to-non-person comparisons, and younger kids likely won&rsquo;t be very good at that.</p> <p>Games can take anywhere from an hour to much, much longer. It all depends on the group playing, and how much side discussion/teasing gets going. Really, the enjoyment comes from the ridiculous comparisons, and the stories that these will spark. Advancing across the board is more of a background activity.</p> <p><strong>Care</strong></p> <p>Everything packs back up to be stored in the box</p> <p>Avoid spills as this game is made of cardstock and cardboard</p> <p>Wipe the pawns down with a damp cloth</p> <p><strong>Parts and Pieces</strong></p> <p>There are a few versions of this game, but the premise is the same.</p> <p><strong>Concerns</strong></p> <p>This game won&rsquo;t be fun with players who can&rsquo;t take a joke, or don&rsquo;t like being compared to objects.&nbsp;</p>
iMAgiNiff Game
Date published: 2016-07-31
7.00 / 10 stars

iMAgiNiff Game

by Buffalo Games
current stage2016-07-31

Comparing people to objects has never been so socially acceptable. This game invited people to compare themselves and others to non-people categories, such as events, songs, and objects. Great for a laugh, so long as everyone playing can take the jokes as well as they can hand ‘em out.

Most users enjoy the way this game’s simple concept typically results in people laughing at the ludicrously of the questions, and the good-natured arguments that follow. Though some users were not always satisfied with the answer choices, we easily remedied that by coming up with our own, as we discuss under Play. 

  • iMAgiNiff Game
iMAgiNiff Game
Overall7.00
This measure how often, for how long, and how many different ages will play with this toy. A great toy will be loved for years, and is still wanted as the child grows.
Replay
  • 7.00
 
This measures the quality of the materials and production processes used.
Quality
  • 7.00
 
This scores how well a toy encourages critical thinking, pattern recognition, and memory improvement.
Cognitive
  • 7.00
 
Including both gross and fine motor skills, this measure how much this toy engages and challenges physical mobility, body awareness, and coordination.
Motor
  • 5.00
 
This measures how likely a toy is to spark social play between children or how well it teaches socially healthy behavior.
Social
  • 9.00
 

Product Specs

Age 14+
Made in China
Recalls No
Batteries None
Materials Cards, Plastic
Choking Hazard Not if used appropriately
Date Reviewed 07/31/2016

Where to Buy

Amazon $24.99
Pros
  • Quick, easy set-up
  • Fast play only interrupted by laughing and joking
  • Gameplay is more rewarding than winning
Cons
  • Not for people who can’t take being the butt of a joke
  • Answers can feel limiting, so feel free to make your own
Detailed Review

Toy Description

A gameboard with sections to add in player names is the basis for this card-drawing game of comparing friends to objects.

Play

Set-up is done by putting the names of eight players along the Name Circle. Please use the included non-permanent marker, or a dry erase marker when doing this. If there are not eight people playing, or those players don’t all know each other very well, feel free to put in the names of fictional characters or celebrities, just so long as they are known to all the players.

A turn starts by a player rolling the die to indicate how many spaces to move the grey marker around the name circle. The marker can be moved in either direction. The person that the marker lands on will be the Subject for the Question card for that turn. Let’s say the marker lands on Sam’s name.

The player who rolled the die draws a Question card, and reads it aloud to the group. Using the name of the player who is this round’s Subject, the card will read something like “Imaginiff…. Sam were a kitchen appliance. Which would Sam be?” There will be six possible answers to choose from, each numbered one through six. Each player shuffles through their Number cards to find the number that corresponds to the answer they think best fits the question.

Each player lays down their Number card facedown. When all players have placed their Number cards, the cards are turned over, and the most popular answer choice is determined. All players who played the most popular number get to move their pawn forward one space on the board.

When our team played it, we changed the rules a bit.

We decided that players could write down their own answers if they didn’t like the available ones. We just used a bunch of scratch paper cut into squares, and each player jotted down a silly answer, then tossed the paper into the bunch. The group decided which answer was the funniest/most creative, and the player who penned it got to move forward one space. This made it more creative feeling. We never actually finished the game due to the laughing, joking, and talking we got into each round. But I totally would have won if we had played to completion.

In short, we changed the rules to be more of an Apples to Apples sort of game.

Observations

Let’s be clear: this is not a game for people who can’t take a little ribbing. The entire point of the game is to laugh while expressing the essence of a player’s personality as an object or situation. People who think themselves a sleek, stainless steel, high powered blender when compared to kitchen appliances shouldn’t get upset when the other players say they’re more of a fridge. Laugh, mock without being cutting, and accept the jokes with the same good humor as used when dishing them out.

Users agree that this game is only as fun as the players make it. If one player doesn’t want to get creative with their reasons for their answer, or can’t risk poking a little fun because someone is too sensitive, then this game simply won’t play out well.

We’re giving this game a high Social score because of the way it encourages players to read the emotional reactions of those around them, as well as tempering any internal awkwardness when they themselves are the subject of a Question card. All in all, this game is a good way to practice how jolly, light hearted teasing works in real life.

It seems to work best with players who already feel comfortable with each other, meaning it’s not all that great as an ice-breaker. At the same time, it’s also not all that great for people who maybe already know everything about each other.

Recommended for ages 14 and up, this game doesn’t work well for younger children. The Question cards aren’t racy or risqué in any way, but a fun game experience requires coming up with creative person-to-non-person comparisons, and younger kids likely won’t be very good at that.

Games can take anywhere from an hour to much, much longer. It all depends on the group playing, and how much side discussion/teasing gets going. Really, the enjoyment comes from the ridiculous comparisons, and the stories that these will spark. Advancing across the board is more of a background activity.

Care

Everything packs back up to be stored in the box

Avoid spills as this game is made of cardstock and cardboard

Wipe the pawns down with a damp cloth

Parts and Pieces

There are a few versions of this game, but the premise is the same.

Concerns

This game won’t be fun with players who can’t take a joke, or don’t like being compared to objects. 

Manufacturer's Description

The Object of the Game is to match the other player’s answers to questions about yourself, friends, family or famous people you've never met! Keep choosing the most popular answers to win!

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